Posts Tagged ‘writing craft’

Author-secrets-writing-style

In our Author Secrets column we have already talked about finding inspiration and ideas for writing, and how to get started, writing routine and we even took a look at the daily rituals of famous writers.  This time, we will talk about style and craft of your writing, and what some of the world’s famous writers have to say about finding your own style of writing.

Author Secrets: Writing Style & Craft

“What a writer has to do is write what hasn’t been written before or beat dead men at what they have done.”
—Ernest Hemingway

“You have to follow your own voice.  You have to be yourself when you write.  In effect, you have to announce,  ‘This is me, this is what I stand for, this is what you get when you read me.  I’m doing the best I can—buy me or not—but this is who I am as a writer.”
—David Morrell

“You should really stay true to your own style.  When I first started writing, everybody said to me, ‘Your style just isn’t right because you don’t use the really flowery language that romances have.’  My romances—compared to what’s out there—are very strange, very odd, very different.  And I think that’s one of the reasons they’re selling.”
—Jude Deveraux

“I’m very concerned with the rhythm of language.  ‘The sun came up’ is an inadequate sentence.  Even though it conveys all the necessary information, rhythmically it’s lacking.  The sun came up.  But, if you say, as Laurie Anderson said, ‘The sun came up like a big bald head,’ not only have you, perhaps, entertained the fancy of the reader, but you have made a more complete sentence.  The sound of a sentence.”
—Tom Robbins

“We, and I think I’m speaking for many writers, don’t know what it is that sometimes comes to make our books alive.  All we can do is to write dutifully and day after day, every day, giving our work the very best of what we are capable.  I don’t think that we can consciously put the magic in; it doesn’t work that way.  When the magic comes, it’s a gift.”
—Madeleine L’Engle

Source: Writers’ Digest magazine, 90 years worth of author secrets